Cardigan People 12: Where’s Willy 1935/6?

G M on the front wall of the Guildhall indicates George V who reigned from 1910 until 20 Jan 1936.

I have enlarged the above photograph and divided it into sections to make it a little easier to see the faces. In the captions beneath each photo an attempt has been made to name the individuals numbered. If you recognize anyone (all suggestions welcomed) please let me know. Ask your parents, grandparents or great-grandparents!
Bottom Left 1
1 Trevor Williams, the Pav
Any other names, please?
Top Left 1
1 Wynford Williams
; policeman (right) PC Eddie Jones?
Bottom 2
1 Miss Davies, North Rd.; 2 Fred Lewis, Pendre; 3 policeman PC Eddie Jones? ; 4 policeman?; 5 Owen Williams
Bottom 3
1 Owen Richards; 2 Gwylfa Richards; 3 Arthur Lewis; 4 Idris Harper, Finch Sq.; 5 ?Maggie Evans, Green St
Bottom 4
1 David Jones, Tivy-side; 2 to his left = ?John Jones, China Shop; 2 ?; 3?;
Bottom 5
1?; 2?; 3 postman?; 4 ?Dr Lyn
Mayor and Councillors 1
5 Hubert Davies; 10 David J. Rotie, mace bearer; 11 Arthur Thomas, Ealing Dene; 13 David Williams, Greenfield Row 15 John Evans, headmaster?
Mayor and Councillors 2
2 John Jenkins, Hillside; 3 Tom James, Trebared; 6 Dan Williams, Y Bwthyn; 7 Jim Thomas, Commercial; 9 John Williams, mace bearer
Top Right 1
Policemen?; Girl Guides; Soldiers
Top Right 2
Soldiers, etc.

Cardigan People 11: Hannah Trollip; John Evans; Griff James; J. Stephen Hughes; J. H. Johns

Hannah Trollip (d. 14.01.1873, aged 37 years)

Wife of Jacob , a baker in High St. [Volks]; After her death he married Julia (d. 05.12.1877) and then married Letitia, who survived him.

John Evans, headmaster of the Board School (b. c.1865)

Native of Llanllawddog. Mayor in 1926–7 and 1940–1

Griffith John James, Finch Square (1869–18.09.1980)

Confectioner, treasurer at Bethania Chapel. Manufacturer of the finest ice-cream outside Italy!

J. Stephen Hughes (rtd. as Manager of Lloyds Bank 30.06.1938)

Brought up in Blaenffos. Member of St Mary’s; secretary of the Parochial Church Council. Retired to Gwalia Hall, Cilgerran. Treasurer to a number of local clubs and societies, including the Golf Club, Tivy-side Hunt, Fat Stock Show and many more.

John Henry Johns (17.09.1897–26.0.1982)

Relieving Officer. Lived at Palmyra, Feidrfair, later in Napier St. Possessed a rich singing voice. Precentor at Bethania Chapel.

Cardigan People 10: James Thomas; Mrs James Thomas; Leonard V. D. Owen; Revd Griffith Davies; Elizabeth Tattersall

James Thomas ‘Jim Commercial’ (b. 30.06.1879)

Licensee of the Commercial, Pendre for many years. Town Councillor, mayor in 1953.

Mrs James Thomas

Wife of James, licensee of the Commercial, Pendre.

Leonard V. D. Owen (1888–1952)

Born in Lion Terrace. Professor of History at Nottingham University. He was educated at Llandovery School and Keeble College Oxford, where he gained a first class honours degree in Modern History in 1911. Won the Stanhope Prize at Oxford. During the First World War, he served as captain in the 5th Battalion of the Oxford and Bucks Light infantry. He lectured at Bangor and Sheffield University before joining University College Nottingham in 1920 to become Professor of History. He was honorary president of University College’s History Society, a member of the Council of the Pipe Roll Society and a member of the Lincoln Record Society. Retired from the University of Nottingham in 1951. He had an interest in local history, was joint editor of the Thoroton Society of Notts, and wrote articles on a number of the manuscript sources. His published monographs include ‘The connection between England and Burgundy during the first half of the fifteenth century’ (1909). ‘England and the Low Countries 1405-1413’ in English Historical Review (1913).  With R.L. Archer and A.E. Chapman, ‘The teaching of history in elementary schools’ (1916).

His brother David died during WWI and his name appears on the town Cenotaph.

Revd Griffith Thomas (d.20.05.1876)

Native of Llantood. Vicar of Cardigan.

Elizabeth Tattersall (d.11.07.1933, aged 76 yrs.)

Teacher at the Secondary School.

Cardigan People 9: Margaret Skinner; Dr Dan Rees; William Roberts; David M. Palmer; David J. Parry

Margaret Skinner (d. Nov. 1911)

Ran the Sailor’s Home, 4 Pendre with her husband Richard Leonard. Member of Tabernacl (MC)

Dr Dan Rees, headmaster (d. 1938)

A native of Llandysul, he was educated at Gwilym Marles School, and William James school, Llandysul.  Unitarian; Carmarthen Presbyterian College under Principal Evans; Aberystwyth College for 1 year where BA degree 1st divis (London). London Univ MA Classics. Oxford – awarded Hibbert Scholarship which he carried to Berlin and Leipsig, where he took his Doctorate in Philosophy and Celtic. Finally he went to Paris where he studied for six months at the Sorbonne. Appointed in 1897–1932; Married Elizabeth M Davies eldest daughter of Rev John Davies, Shrewsbury and had 1 son. Headmaster of Cardigan County School for 36 years. After his retirement he moved to Hastings. He had been unwell for some time, and on medical advice decided to take a holiday in Sicily. Whilst on the train at Lyon, in France he passed away. His wife was with him at the time. His remains were cremated in France.

 ‘Dr Dan Rees was not in the roll of common men. There was a distinction about hm which could not but impress all with whom he came in contact. He had that elusive thing called personality…

The schoolroom was his dukedom and here he wielded a daily influence the value of which it is impossible to estimate.’ editorial CTA 11.3.1938

William Roberts (1862–1912), author of the hymn-tune Bryngogarth

Born on 1 Oct. 1862 at 21 Castle St. Of frail physique; apprenticed as a carpenter but later a shop-keeper at the top of Bridge St. Learnt the rudiments of music from Benjamin Lewis, Blaenannerch. Violinist and harpist. Composed many hymn tunes for children. Died at age of 50. Buried at Blaenffos. Composed the famous hymn-tune Bryngogarth, named after the house of his minister Revd John Williams, Bethania, in Napier St.

Bryngogarth

David Morgan Palmer, headmaster (d. 17 May 1917, aged 84 yrs.)

A native of Llanfallteg. ‘For many years ran the Collegiate School very successfully, and afterwards became for a brief period headmaster of the newly started Intermediate School.’ J W James

David John Parry, Netpool (1907–1976)

Clerk at the local Ministry of Labour in Pendre.

Cardigan People 8: John Young; Samuel Young; Wm J. Williams; David Williams, Mary Wilson

John Young (1816–3.12.1887) and Hannah, his wife (b. 1814)

A native of Ferwig. Bootmaker working in William St. Member of Bethania. Eldest son was Samuel (below).

Samuel Young (1851–19.02.1928)

Son of John and Hannah (above). Married 1) Ellen Griffiths in 1878, and 2) Minnie Ridgeway in 1908. Graduated from Oxford. Maltster at Pendre. Lived at Bronwydd House, St Mary’s St. Town Councillor. Mayor of Cardigan in 1908 and 1921. Member of Bethania.

William J. Williams (18.05.1864–14.02.1942)

Native of Manian Fawr, St Dogmael’s. Solicitor. Member of Cardigan Borough Council in 1891. Mayor in 1896. Liberal in politics. Member of Bethania Chapel. Lived at Penralltddu.

David Williams (1867–1955)

Lived at No. 6 Greenfield Row. In 1911 he was a carriage and motor works foreman. Secretary of Bethania Chapel for 52 years. Past President of the Cards. & Carms. Baptist Association; and treasurer of the Cards. Baptist Association. He was a former secretary of the Glanteify Lodge of Oddfellows. Founder member of Cardigan Lodge of Loyal Order of Moose. Town councillor for 26 years, and mayor in 1932–3.

He was buried at Blaenwaun, St Dogmaels.

Mary Wilson, Macclesfield, hawker, 25 year old inmate at Cardigan Gaol, 1871.

An extremely rare photograph of the inside of the gaol.

Cardigan People 7: Andrew Morgan; Edwin Morgan; Willie Jeremiah; Arthur Jones; Alfred Sulman

Andrew James Morgan (d. 21.10.1941, aged 23 yrs.)

Lived in 20 Eben’s Lane. Merchant Navy during WW2. Drowned on board the SS Treverbyn. His name is engraved on the town Cenotaph (below). Brother of Edwin, below.

Edwin Morgan (d.19.2.1978)

Lived at Maeshenffordd. Local Postman. Brother of the above Andrew.

Left: Willie Jeremiah (1919–2011)

Lived in Greenfield Row.

Right: Arthur Jones (1928–91)

Lived in Greenfield Row, later Maesglas.

Alfred W. R. Sulman (1895–1979) Native of Skeyton, Norfolk.

Lived at the Drawbridge and Maeshenffordd.

Cardigan People 6: Mission Hall

Cardigan People 5: John Davies (Ossian Dyfed)

John Davies (Ossian Dyfed; 1852–1916)

John Davies (Ossian Dyfed) was born in Ossian House, Eben’s Lane in 1852, the son of Phoebe Davies who died in 1857 at the early age of 29 years. He began his career as a carpenter, then he worked as a printer and journalist on the Tivy-side. He began to compete in Bethsaida Eisteddfod in 1868, when he first used the name Ossian Dyfed. He won over 50 eisteddfodic prizes.

He left Cardigan to work on the Brecon Express, Y Darian and the Mellten (Merthyr Tudful). He returned to Cardigan and attended D. M. Palmer’s Academy before entering Brecon Memorial College in 1873. He was a minister with the Indpendents in Llanelli (Tabernacl), and during his ministry the membership increased to 400.

He moved to Swansea and membership increased from 60 to 230. He moved then to Tollington Park, London where the membership doubled within three years. He then moved to Richmond Hill, Bornemouth, and finally to Paddington, London, 1897–1903.

He married Elizabeth Davies, Llandeilo in 1881, and they had a son Sidney and a daughter Gwladys. His brother was the Revd. T. Eynon Davies.

He published two volumes of sermons: Old but [yet?] ever new, 1904 and The Dayspring from on High, 1907. Ossian Dyfed died on 24 September 1916 in Shortlands, Kent.

… and one other interesting fact: In 1911 the family was served by a servant maid by the name of Lisette Schmidt, from Germany.

Corner of Eben’s Lane
Ossian House, 2018

Cardigan People 4: Thomas Evans (Tel)

Thomas Evans (Tel; 1861–1929)

You may have heard of Telynog but here is his nephew Tel. Born in Mwldan Upper in 1861. His father John (Telynog’s brother) was a bootmaker and precentor at Bethania (1864–76). Thomas moved to Aberdare in 1888. He was employed as a miner and underground fireman. He also was a fine poet and often competed at local eisteddfodau. His wife Ruth died in 1908. In 1909 he won his first chair in Llwynypia eisteddfod. He won the chair for ‘Angladd ar y Môr’ (Funeral on the Sea) in Cardigan’s Semi-National Eisteddfod of 1909, in front of a crowd of 8, 000. He won 10 bardic chairs. He was also a fine musician, as a choirmaster and he led many Singing Festival across Wales. Tel was also active in the mining community and played an important role on the local miners’ Sliding Scale Committee. He had 8 children, two of them Taliesin (ap Tel) and Ceridwen (Telferch) were also poets.

Cofio Tel
Angladd ar y Môr, Tel. Pryddest Gadeiriol Aberteifi, 1909.

Cardigan People 3: Maria Ann Jeremiah; Elizabeth Lowther; Frances Jeremiah; Rachel Griffiths; Margaret Gray

Maria Anne Jeremiah (1885–1949)

Lived at 15 Greenfield Row

Elizabeth Lowther (c.1833–c.1896)

Wife of Launcelot Lowther. Lived in St Mary’s St.

Frances Jeremiah (1914–30)

Lived in Greenfield Row

Rachel Griffiths (d. 1936, aged 47 yrs.)

Born at Feidrlas. Lived in 22 Eben’s Lane.

Margaret S. Gray (d.1983, aged 72 yrs).

Lived at Glenroy, Bridge St.

Cardigan People 2: Arthur Clougher; John Daniel; Picton Davies; Capt. James Ellis; Asa Johnes Evans

Arthur Clougher (1864–1932)

Newsagent, bookseller, and stationer at 18 High St. Town councillor, and mayor in 1901–02 and 1916–17. He lived at Brooklands, Pendre.

John Daniel (1861–1923)

House furnisher at 19 High St. Town councillor. Mayor 1904–05, 1914. Guardian of the Poor (c.1912).

Picton G. Davies (1885–1970)

Shop assistant at a local ironmonger. Precentor at Bethania Baptist chapel from 1916. From 1916 until 1920 he conducted and trained Cardigan Juvenile Choir, and won at many eisteddfodau; led the choir when it sang at the opening ceremony of Cardigan Memorial Hospital. He conducted singing festivals at Pontyates and Ponthenry, and was responsible for several radio (Caniadaeth y Cysegr) and tv broadcasts from Bethania.

Capt. James Ellis (1810–95).

1848 captain of the Eclair; 1851 captain of the Heather Bell. Retired in 1881. Lived at 9 Castle St in 1854.

Asa Johnes Evans (1810–88)

A solicitor who was the senior partner of the firm of Messrs. Asa and Ivor Evans, solicitors, Green Street. He was a town councillor, and chosen mayor in 1875 and 1876. A Liberal in politics, and a member of the Baptist cause, he had held several important offices, not the least being that of solicitor to the Baptist Association, which office he held for many years.

Cardigan People 2: one of a series to record the faces of people associated with Cardigan, with added notes for each individual where possible. The notes will change as more information comes to light (or corrections made), but the facts will remain. Contributions welcomed. If you have photographs in the attic I would be pleased to hear from you.

Cardigan People 1: William Adey, Thomas F. Baldwin, Evan Bowen, Gwyneth Bowen, Capt. John Bowen

William Pritchard Adey (1915–1987)

Journalist on the Cardigan and Tivy-side Advertiser. Poet: he published Look to the Hills, 1982. Sec. of the horticultural section of the Cardigan and District Agricultural Show. Sec. of the Old Teifi Net Fishermen’s Defence Assoc. Lived in Church St, and later in Bron-y-dre.

Thomas F. Baldwin (1880–1935).

A native of Plymouth. Came to Cardigan c.1910. Ran a fancy goods shop in Empire House, Pendre. Scoutmaster of the 1st Cardigan St Mary’s Troop.

Evan Bowen (b. 1863)

A grocer (Bowen Brothers). He lived at the Elms, Priory St. Town councillor, and alderman by 1914. His wife died in 1904. Mayor in 1905, and his 5yr old daughter Gwyneth, the mayoress.

Gwyneth Bowen (b.14.07.1902)

Mayoress in 1905 to accompany her father Evan (see above).

Capt. John Bowen, master of the Ruth. (d. 24.06.1870, aged 59 yrs.)

His wife Margaret (1815–07.04.1892) and three daughters, Jane (1843– ), Hannah (1846– ) and Ann (1849– ) shown, and Mary lived in Greenfield Row. John is not mentioned in the Cardigan census after 1841 (away at sea?). Buried in Cardigan Cemetery.

Cardigan People 1: the first in a series to record the faces of people associated with Cardigan, with added notes for each individual where possible. The notes will change as more information comes to light (or corrections made), but the facts will remain. Contributions welcomed. If you have photographs in the attic I would be pleased to hear from you.

Who was Telynog?

Thomas Evans (TELYNOG; 1839–1865)

The plaque on the corner of Eben’s Lane

Many years ago, despite walking passed this plaque several times a day I had little or no idea about Telynog or Ossian Dyfed. The plaque does not reveal very much about either. Not even their full names. Later I became aware that Telynog was listed amongst the ranks of the famous in the Dictionary of Welsh Biography. This is what I read here:

Born 8 September 1840 at Cardigan, son of Thomas Evans, boatmaker of that town. At the age of eleven he went to sea in a coastal vessel but, not liking this life, he ran away to Aberdare, where he worked as a miner in Cwm-bach. At an early age he started writing poetry, gaining his first success with a pryddest entitled ‘Gostyngeidd-rwydd’ in an eisteddfod held under the auspices of the Baptist chapel in Cwm-bach, where he was a member. He composed freely both in the free and the strict metres, gaining many successes at local eisteddfodau under the adjudication of poets of such eminence as Islwyn and Cynddelw. At the time of his premature death from consumption at the age of twenty-five he was regarded as one of the most promising poets of Wales. Among his best-known works are the lyrics ‘Blodeuyn bach wyf fi mewn gardd’ and ‘Yr Haf.’ The latter is included in Blodeugerdd by W. J. Gruffydd. A collected edition of his work arranged by his friend Dafydd Morganwg (D. W. Jones) with a biographical sketch by Hywel Williams was published in 1866. He died 29 April 1865 and was buried in the Aberdare cemetery.

His works and life story is included here:

Cardigan and the Sea 2

Cardigan’s geographical location on the banks of the river Teifi leading to Cardigan Bay, the Irish Sea, the Atlantic and beyond, means that the sea has always had an influence on its history. Wandering through the burial records and reading the gravestones of those buried in the Church cemetery, reveals the hopes and aspirations of Cardigan’s youth and the tragedies that occurred in so many families.

The river has always been a dangerous place for young children to play.

  • David William, 11 years old and the 3rd son of John ac Elizabeth drowned in July 1844.
  • In June 1890 William Henry Smith, Mwldan drowned in the river.

Some drowned by crossing the bar.

  • George Jefferson, 17 years old, and John Pratt, 22 years old, both drowned when the brig Active sank, in June 1825.

Cardigan Bay was the last place for some to see daylight.

  • Richard Finch, the 27 year old son of Mary, drowned in March 1827.
  • Thomas Thomas, 15 years old drowned in October 1843.
  • David Davies, Parc Llwyd, Aber-porth, 70 years old drowned in 1851.
  • John Evans, 30 years old drowned in November 1866.

A little further afield, William Phillips, a second mate on board SS Cyfarthfa drowned when he fell into the East Bute Dock, Cardiff October 1897. He left a widow and 2 children.

The following were drowned on various sea voyages where the ship’s destiny is not revealed.

  • Morgan Morgan, 45 years old, in December 1846.
  • William Miles, 19 years old, son of John and Dorothy, in December 1847.
  • William James, 29 years old in April 1853.
  • John Charles, 31 years old, son of David in August 1893.

When places are mentioned the distances travelled by Cardigan sailors are revealed. It is clear that Cardigan was not “the land that time forgot” and Cardigan people could be found in all corners of the globe well before the opening of the Cardigan to Carmarthen railway, the coming of the motor car and bus trips, or the building of Cardiff airport!

Here is a small sample of the evidence:

  • Rowland Rowlands, 20 years old, died on 25 April 1796 in the West Indies.
  • James Evans, 26 years old, master of the schooner Nymph died near Cape Clear, February 1833.
  • Daniel Davies, 40 years old, died near Cape Clear [off the Irish coast], November 1838.
  • James Owens, 25 years old, son of David and Diana, died near Crow Head, North West Ireland, November 1838.
  • John Roberts, 20 years old, died near the  Cape of Good Hope, September 1848.
  • William Davies, 38 years old, master of the schooner Harmony died in Tralee, May 1849.
  • Thomas Jones, 19 years old drowned and all the crew of the Pomona, on the Scottish coast February 1850.
  • Isaac Griffiths, 23 years old, drowned near the African coast, June 1850.
  • David Morris, 23 year old son of Evan and Margaret, died in San Fransisco December 1850.
  • George Lord, 10 month old, born at sea and died in Valparaiso [Chile] 1851.
  • John Mathias, 26 year old died of cholera in Rotterdam September 1854.
  • David Owens, 52 years old, died on board the schooner Master De Carri sailing from Pomeron, December 1854
  • John Griffiths, sailmaker, 59 years old, died in Malta May 1855.
  • John W. Jones, 16 years old on the brig Hope in 1856.
  • John White, 44 years old died died in Rio de Janeiro March 1857.
  • Capten William Finch, 37 years old, died in Rio de Janeiro May 1857.
  • William White, 28 years old, son of George and Sarah died in Quebec October 1860.
  • Mary Runnegar, 35 years old, died in Richmond, Australia May 1861.
  • James Timothy, 20 years old, fell overboard the barque Jone of Sunderland February 1863 on route from Mauritius to London.
  • David Thomas, died on board the schooner William Edward from Gloucester in the Bay of Biscay June 1863.
  • Phillip Phillips, 39 years old died on board the brig Harmony of Cardiff near the Scottish coast December 1865.
  • John Stephens, 45 years old died in Cuba, 1867.
  • David Davies, 27 years old, died on board the Sclavonica, by Leith in 1867.
  • David Sambrook, 52 years old, died on board the Harlech Castle near Cape Horn, August 1868.
  • William Tudor Davies, son of Tudor and Elizabeth, 23 years old and chief officer died on board the Almora, on route from Bombay to Liverpool September 1868.
  • Captain William Jones, 41 years old, drowned on route from Philadelphia to Plymouth 17 September 1869.
  • John Owens, 23 oed, died on route from the Mediterranean December 1870; and his brother James, 35 years old died on route from Shields to Mollendo [Southern Peru] December 1871.
  • William Jenkins, 21 years old, son of David died near Cape Horn, September 1872.
  • John Lloyd 26 years old died of yellow fever in Rio de Janeiro June 1873.
  • John Thomas, 45 years old, died while managing the barque Maggie of Swansea. He died in Plymouth and was buried there in May 1874.
  • Evan Thomas, ship master, William St., 36 years old, died in St Helena, 16 October 1875.
  • Thomas Harries Griffiths, 40 years old died on board the brig Leading Star on route from Shields to Folkestone November, 1875.
  • Stephen James, 49 years old died in Geddes November 1876.
  • Thomas Owens, 37 years old, died on route from Bombay to London, on board the Flora August 1877.
  • Captain John Morgan, 56 years old, died in Quebec Hospital, 1881 and was buried in Quebec.
  • Henry Greenhill Trollip, second son of Jacob, 19 years old died on board the ship Easterhill April 1886.
  • Thomas Morgan, 35 years old, died in Pera Hospital, Brazil January 1887.

Tragedy struck some families across more than one generation.

  • Thomas and James, sons of Owen and Elizabeth Thomas, drowned at sea as well as their grandson John Lloyd
  • David Davies, Parc Llwyd drowned in Cardigan Bay in 1851 and his son David died from burns on board the ship Amazon, January 1852.
  • David Williams, 11 years old, and 3rd son of John and Elizabeth, drowned by the Quay in Cardigan in 1844; their 4th son William, 16 years old was washed overboard the Susannah on the North West coast of Ireland in December 1844.
  • William Williams, 52 years old, master of the brig Jane of Cardigan died in Limerick, October 1825; Lewis, his 23 years old son drowned in February 1833; another son John, 18 years old drowned off the coast at Holyhead in the Mary of Cardigan in October 1838; and a third son Thomas, 34 years old died in New York in July 1847.

Saturday Night at the Black – new book

Copies selling fast: email     

netpool1960@gmail.com

to order a copy by post £12.50.

Cardigan in the Swinging Sixties!

Cardigan in the Swinging Sixties! (front cover)

Cardigan in the Swinging Sixties! (back cover)

Cardigan in the Swinging Sixties! (back cover)

Saturday Night at the Black: Cardigan in the Swinging Sixties. 183pp. with over 100 illustrations, many of which you will not have seen before, by William H. Howells. Price £10. Printed by E. L. Jones, Aberteifi. ISBN 978 1 78280 7698

Is Cardigan ready for this?

It’s a remarkable story! The background is the close connection between some of the town’s characters and those linked with the emerging Liverpool music scene at the time. People like the dramatist Alun Owen, who came to live in St Dogmael’s between 1963 and 1967; Allan Williams, the Beatles’ first manager; Bill Harry, founder and editor of the pioneering Mersey Beat newspaper; Bob Wooler, the Cavern’s famous DJ; and George Melly, who bought a summer house in Pen-y-bryn. This motley crew, with their partners, were warmly welcomed by Frank Aspinall, of the Black Lion, and with their help organised Liverpool bands to play in the Black.

The book contains a complete list of all the groups who played there between 1963 and 1973. At first they came from the Cavern – many via the Kaiserkeller and other Hamburg clubs. Do you remember the visit of Screaming Lord Sutch to Cardigan? What about Rory Storm and the Hurricanes; Ian and the Zodiacs; The Clayton Squares; Vince Earl and the Talismen; Freddie Starr and the Nightriders; Sony Webb and the Cascades; Derry Wilkie and the Pressmen; The Kirkbys; The Masterminds; The Chessmen and The Kinsleys and many more?

Later the groups came from South Wales: do you remember James Hogg, The Iveys; Haverson Apricot; Peter Shane and the Vikings – and let’s not forget local groups including Ricky and the Raiders and Strawberry Maize?

Every Saturday night over 200 teenagers flowed into the town from a wide area of Cardiganshire, Pembrokeshire and Carmarthenshire to dance, to listen to music and to enjoy.

But not everyone was happy with these developments. Parents warned their offsprings not to go near such a place, and the respectable town councillors were unhappy that the Black gave the town a bad image.

Cardigan has not seen anything like this before or since.

Read the truth about the connection of the Beatles with the local Eisteddfod!

Read about the close link between ‘A Hard Day’s Night’ and St Dogmael’s.

You’ll be surprised to read the candid memories of those who were a part of the scene.

Available in bookshops NOW £10.

or email netpool1960@gmail.com to order a copy by post £12.50.

31 December (1983) Bon Marche closed

  • 31 1983 (Sat.) Bon Marche closed. When the shop opened in 1907: “The support of the upper structure of the premises is by an iron girder weighing over five tons, which does away with all columns, and gives additional space internally. It is the first of its kind in Cardigan.”
  • 31 1887 (Sat.) Reported that a crayon study by Frank Miles was to appear in the January edition of Cassell’s Magazine.