Cardigan People 47: Helen Samee

On 4 December 1823 John Lloyd, the curate of St Mary’s Church baptised Helen, the child of Ramo and Helen Samee.

Does the name ring a bell? Ramo Samee (1791-1850), her father was a famous Indian juggler and magician.

He and his wife came over to Europe around 1810, and he made a tour of the United States in 1819. He was quite a showman:

Samee performed a trick he called “stringing beads with the mouth”, in which he “swallowed” a handful of beads and a piece of string, then pulled the beads out of his mouth, one by one, tied to the string. Samee was also a sword-swallower (swallowing 2 foot long swords!) and a fire-eater. In his fire act, he would light a piece of rope, place it on a plate, and proceed to “eat” it as a meal. He called it his “light dinner”.

William Hazlitt’s essay The Indian Jugglers (Table Talk, 1828) provides an interesting account although Ramo is not named.

In July 1823 he performed in Swansea as this advert in The Cambrian shows:

He died in 1850, so poor that his wife had to advertise for financial help to bury him.

The big question, of course, is what was his connection with Cardigan? Did he live here or was the family just passing through?

In the 1881 Census return for London (West Hackney) Helen (or Ellen by then) Samee’s birthplace is given as Cardigan, and the records of St Mary’s Church show that she was baptised here.

She and her mother are described as Needlewomen but life was hard and they both spent periods in the Workhouse during the second half of the nineteenth century (discharged on 26 Apr 1850 and again on 2 June 1882). Ellen Samee died in 1884.

If the Tivy-side had been published in 1823 I wonder what their headline would have been:
Daughter of famous Indian juggler baptised at St Mary’s, perhaps.     Perhaps not.

Cardigan People 46: Derek Greenslade Childs

from William St. to Llandaf Cathedral;
from a baker’s son to Archbishop of Wales

Derek Greenslade Childs (14 January 1918 – 18 March 1987)

According to ‘Wikipedia’ Childs grew up in Laugharne. No mention is made of his birthplace.

He has not reached the Dictionary of Welsh Biography yet.

But Derek Greensalde Childs was baptised on 10 March 1918 at St Mary’s Church, Cardigan by B. J. Jones, the curate. His parents were Alfred John and Florence Theodosa. The address given was 17 William St., Cardigan

Alfred came originally from Laugharne, and Florence (Jones) lived in 17 William St. They were married on 17 March 1916 at St Mary’s Church. Presumably Alfred came to live in Cardigan at that time. His occupation is given as baker.

Derek was educated at Whitland Grammar School, before reading history at University College, Cardiff. He studied theology at Salisbury Theological College, before being ordained in 1942.

Derrick Greenslade Childs was the Anglican Bishop of Monmouth (1970-86) and Archbishop of Wales (1983-86).

He died as a result of a motor accident in 1987.

Living authority: Essays in memory of Archbishop Derrick Childs was published in 1990.

Cardigan People 31: Revd John Herring (1789–1832)

Revd John Herring was the minister of Bethania Chapel from 1811 until 1832. He died after an illness that lasted some months. He left a wife and 7 small children. What else do we know about him?

The piece in the Dictionary of Welsh Biography can be read here:

https://biography.wales/article/s-HERR-JOH-1789

Well there is a story that one fine summer’s day in July while he was on one of his preaching tours in north Wales, he met the famous Revd Christmas Evans who took one look at him and said “What a strange thing to see a herring on top of a mountain”. Quick as a flash Herring replied “ Surely not more than to see Christmas in the middle of summer?” Touche as they say.

In another version the two were on top of the Frenni Fawr. By 1909 the story had changed a bit:

Christmas Evans and John Herring meet. When Mr Herring saw his friend, he shouted ‘Strange, strange, to come across Christmas in the middle of summer.’ ‘Yes, it is’, replied Mr Evans, ‘but stranger still to meet a live herring on top of a mountain.’

His unusual surname was an opportunity for many a story: Once, down in Llanboidy, he was preaching so eloquently that Mr. Powell, Maes-gwyn, a prominent local man asked ‘Who is that? ‘Herring, Cardigan’ was the reply from someone sitting nearby. ‘No, not a herring, he said but a Salmon.

But there is more to the Revd John Herring than an unusual surname.

In 1836, four years after his death D. Roberts, Llandiloes, published a booklet entitled: Derwen Wylofain.

The short biography included reveals a little of his background:

John was born to Thomas and Sarah Herring, Llanyspyddyd, Breconshire in 1789. His father died when John was 4 or 5 years old. His mother remarried and the family moved to the iron works at Ebbw Vale. John was employed at the local blacksmith.

His humorous character was revealed early on. ‘How many sects are there?’ he asked his employer one morning.

‘I think there are five of any use, and those five are in our house. My stepfather is Indepenent, my mother a Methodist, I will go to the Quakers and I’ll make my cat a Wesleyan and the little dog a Baptist’. Indeed he took his dog with him one Sunday morning to see a baptism in the Sirhowy river by Tredegar deciding to throw the dog in the river when the Revd Edward Davies was preaching. But it was not to be. Listening to the sermon he became a believer and it was he who was baptised and not the dog. He became a member of the Baptist Church at Tredegar in 1804. [Siloh says Revd. B. James (Edwards, Bethania, p. 30)]

The rest, as they say, is history…

He began preaching when he was 16 years old. Under the influence of the Revd John Hier, Basaleg, he was accepted as a student in the Colege at Bristol when he was 20/21 years old. He had had enough after a year. ‘What is the use of Hic, Haec, Hoc, to save souls’

On a preaching tour he was invited to Bethanis and accepted a calling in 1811. He remained there until his death in 1832.

  • He was an exceptional preacher.

“he was one of the funniest and most popular preachers of his day”

“he was possessed of a prolific understanding, a multitude of words, a natural and effective eloquence, a tenacious memory, proper gestures, a melodious voice

But he wasn’t a perfect man ‘despite his excellent qualities he was not without his weaknesses’ (these are not listed).

  • He was an excellent organiser. He drew up a list of rules and regulations on to how to organize a Church in a pamphlet entitled: ‘‘Penderfyniadau i’w gosod mewn gweithrediad yn Eglwys y Bedyddwyr yn Methania, Aberteifi, a fabwysiadwyd mewn Cyfarfod a gynhaliwyd Tachwedd 18fed, 1829,’ [Decisions to be undertaken at Bethania Baptist Church, Cardigan, and adopted in a Meeting held on 18th November, 1829’]. He elaborated on many issues: Covetousness–its harm; Generosity–its appeal; Ministers–their maintenance; The Poor–how they should be considered; Discipline–its rule; the neglect of assembling.
  • He was a litterateur: He edited the Greal y Bedyddwyr for a year, and then for a further two years with J. M. Thomas.

He died at Llwynpiod, Cardigan on 2 April 1832, after an illness that had lasted some months. He was buried at Cilfowyr.

He married twice. First to Elizabeth, the daughter of the Revd Griffith Davies, minister of Rehoboth. She died in 1823 leaving three daughters: Mary, Elizabeth and Anne. His second wife was another Elizabeth (Lewis, Crugmor.) They had four children from this marriage.

His second wife died a fortnight after John leaving seven orphans – among them:
Ann, 12 year old (blind and of unsound mind); Dinah, 8 year old (later married James Morse, Trehowell); James, 7 year old. He is listed in 1901 as a retired mariner and living in Northgate Tce. He had married the daughter of the Revd. T. J. Morris and was a member of Capel Mair. He died in 1907; Sarah, 4 year old; Eleanor 2 yea rold. She is listed in 1851 as a housekeeper in Quay St; in 1861 as a housemaid in St Mary St (to Thomas Morgan, solicitor). She was a member at Bethania and died in 1898.

A number of prominent people from the chapel and surrounding district established a fund to help the children.

David Mathias, Cardigan
Timothy Thomas, the elder
William Richard, Penyparc
Daniel Davies (Independent minister), Cardigan
John Morgan, Blaenffos
Daniel Davies, Swansea

Awdl Bryddest Farwnadol i’r diweddar Barch. John Herring, Aberteifi: An elegy to the late Revd John Herring, Cardigan by Asaph Glyn Ebbwy (Thomas Williams, Tredegar). Please see the Welsh version for the 30 verse elegy!

https://aberteifidrwyrcanrifoedd.wordpress.com/2020/09/30/pobl-aberteifi-31-y-parchg-john-herring-1789-1832/

Cardigan People 24: Owen Roberts, Feidrfair, sailor, cook (–1904/05)

A note in Bethania Chapel Minutes first brought Owen Roberts to my attention. Under a list of deaths for 1905 is the following:

Owen Roberts, Feidrfair. Hwyliodd o China i Vladivostock Hydref 1904. Ni chlywyd dim oddi wrthynt drachefn yn yr SS Claverdale. [He sailed from China to Vladivostock in October 1904. Nothing more was heard of them in the SS Claverdale]

A bit of Googling revealed a few interesting items.

Under the heading ‘Fate of the Claverdale’ the Evening Express published the following account on 31 January 1905:

A boat belonging to the overdue British steamer Claverdale has been picked up and taken to Fukuyajna. None of the crew was on board. The Claverdale left Barry on September 1 for Manila, with a cargo of between 5,000 and 6,000 tons of coal on Russian account. On October 29 she was reported at Sabang, and on November 23 left Hong Kong for Vladivostok. Nothing has been heard of her since, and it is presumed that in running the blockade she kept in too close to the land and struck a sunken rock. Captain Thomas, the master of the Claverdale, is a native of Cardigan, and is well known in Cardiff shipping circles.

The Claverdale was the pioneer ship of the Claverdale Steamship Company (Limited), owned by Messrs. E. Hazelhurst and Co., who claimed that this is the first vessel they had lost. She was built in 1899 by Messrs. Graig, Taylor, and Co., of Stockton-on-Tees, is 330 feet long, with a 45 feet beam, and a draught of 18 feet, while her engines registered a nominal horse-power of 278.

By 09 September 1905 the Cardiff Times reported that a Vladivostok telegram dated August 31st stated that a steamer stranded north of Olga was reported to be the missing British s.s. Claverdale, bound from Cardiff to Vladivostok via Hong Kong.

But further inquiries found that the rumour was not true and the reporter on the Cardiff Times was not happy:

This is the second time that such a report has been cabled home from Vladivostok respecting the same ship, and it is unfortunate that the authorities do not make an effort to secure the name of the stranded vessel before telegraphing to England.

The mystery of the missing ship seemed to have been solved by November 1905, according to a report in the County Echo, quoting the Daily Chronicle:

Dispatches received in London reveal for the first time the identity of the wreck which has frequently been sighted to the south of Vladivostok, near the mouth of the Tandse River. The vessel turns out to be the British steamer Claverdale, which left a Chinese port last November with a full cargo of coal for the Russian cruisers at Vladivostok, and which has not since been heard of. As the result of a visit paid to the stranded steamer, it has been ascertained that the vessel has been pillaged by the natives in the neighbourhood, and every article of value taken away. The inhabitants residing in the vicinity, who were interrogated, declared that the crew of the Claverdale’ were removed shortly after the wreck by two boats presumed to be Japanese.

But the missing crew remained missing : Neither owners nor relatives, however, have heard from any of the men. By November 1905 the headline in the Weekly Mail suggested that worse was to come.

WRECK OF THE CLAVERDALE: SUPPOSED MURDER OF MEMBERS OF THE CREW.

The crew who are supposed to have been killed on the Manchuria coast, where the ship was wrecked, included:

H. H. Thomas, Cardigan, commander;
D. Llewellyn, St. Dogmaels, mate
James Reed, Swansea, second mate
D. Jones, Cardiff, carpenter
J. S Campbell, Sunderland, steward
Owen Roberts, Cardigan, cook
Watkin Evans, second steward
John Waddle, boatswain
A. Tripolis, A.B. seaman
R. Thomas, Liverpool, A.B. seaman
G. Marromatic, A.B. seaman
Frederick Cooper, Sunderland, chief engineer
Frederick Walker, second engineer
James Beadle, Sunderland, third engineer
Cornelius Gray, Sunderland, fourth engineer
Carl Lundin (of Sweden), donkeyman
Richard McGuire, Bootle, fireman
B. Mynes, Brumiskin, fireman
W. Flagg, fireman
Gus Langer, fireman
R. J. Jones, fireman
S. Ostovski, fireman
W. Howrie, apprentice
G. B. McLaren, apprentice
Reginald Turner, North-street, Lewes, apprentice
G. A. Saunders, Kingston-road, Portsmouth, apprentice
In addition to these, two other hands, names and nationalities unknown, were taken on to Hong Kong. These were possibly Chinese.

It was claimed that the ship had been boarded by Manchurian pirates and the crew thrown overboard.

In March 1906 the Cardiff Times reported on the proceedings of the Probate Court where the captain named as Edward Evan Thomas, Llangoedmore was presumed dead:

The vessel was found 450 miles north of Vladivostok ashore in the Gull of Tartary deserted, with her decks dismantled. In February, 1905, a boat belonging to the ship was found, and in May the ship was posted at Lloyd’s as a total loss. Eventually the vessel was discovered a total wreck, and only about 300 or 400 tons of cargo remained. The master and crew had disappeared. Captain Thomas left about £1,400. His Lordship granted leave to presume the death of Mr Thomas accordingly.

After all this we’re none the wiser, I’m afraid, as to what actually happened but suffice to say these brave local sailors probably came to a watery end: H. H. Thomas, Cardigan, D. Llewellyn, St. Dogmaels, and Owen Roberts, Cardigan, the cook from Feidrfair.

If a photograph exists of any of these gentlemen I would be pleased to add a copy here.

Cardigan People 22: Goronwy Moelwyn-Hughes MP (1897–1955)

Goronwy Moelwyn-Hughes was born in Priory St* on 6 October 1897 the eldest son of the Revd J. G. Moelwyn-Hughes (1866–1944) who was the minister at Tabernacle Chapel. He attended the local schools before heading for UCW Aberystwyth. During WW1 he served with the West Yorkshire regiment, was wounded , transferred to the Royal Flying Corps and served as a pilot (1917–19). He then returned to Aberystwyth, graduated as BA, entered Downing College, Cambridge where he obtained first-class honours in the law tripos. He was called to the bar in 1922. He fought two unsuccessful general elections for the Liberals in the Rhondda in Nov 1934 and Cardiganshire in 1935. He was the elected unopposed at a by-election in Carmarthen in March 1941, a seat he held until 1945. He was then returned as Labour MP for North Islington in 1950 but retired due to ill health in 1951.

He was appointed as a commissioner for inquiry on to the Burnden Park, Bolton football disaster in 1946, when 33 spectators were crushed by the pressure of numbers. He recommended that football grounds be made subject to safety licensing.

*[Llwyn Onn according to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, but according to 1901 Census Finch’s Sq. The family were living at Glasynys, Priory St. in 1911 (census)]

He frequently returned to Cardigan to visit his parents. Here is an interesting (silent) film he made of his visit in 1933.

https://player.bfi.org.uk/free/film/watch-haf-1933-cardigan-1936-online

25 December (1176, 1888, 1889, 2103) Merry Christmas to all who were born within the sound of the bells of St Mary’s

  • 25 December (Wed.) 1176 The first Eisteddfod

And then the Lord Rhys held a special feast at Cardigan, and he set two kinds of contests: one between the bards and the poets, and another between the harpists and the crowders and the pipers and various classes of string-music. And he set two chairs for the visitors in the contests. And those he enriched with great gifts. And then a young man from his own court won the victory for string-music. And the men of Gwynedd won the victory for poetry. And all the other minstrels received from the Lord Rhys as much as they asked, so that no one was refused. And that feast was proclaimed a year before it was held throughout Wales and England and Scotland and Ireland and many other lands.

1176 Brut y Tywysogyon

  • 25 (Tues.) 1888

CAPEL MAIR

A very successful concert was given in Capel Mair, in this town, on Christmas night, under the presidency of the Rev. W. Jones (Mayor). The building was well-filled, and excellent order was maintained throughout by the conductor, the Rev. T. J. Morris, which was certainly not the least pleasing feature of the gathering. The programme was contributed to by a number of local amateurs, assisted by Eos Myrnach, and a male party from Llanfyrnach, and it will not be considered invidious to say that it was in a great measure owing to their valuable assistance that the concert was one of the best that has been given in the town for some time.

Eos Myrnach possesses a capital voice, and sang several high-class songs with excellent taste and feeling. His rendering of “Alone on the raft” was particularly deserving of mention.

The Llanfyrnach male party, too, proved a great acquisition, and gave evidence of close and careful training, and their rendering of the choruses allotted to them was admirable. “Comrades Song of Hope,” and “Martyrs of the Arena” — the latter including a splendidly rendered quartet- fairly delighted the audience, and were deservedly encored. Mr. Davies led the Llanfyrnach party in the first chorus, and Eos Myrnach afterwards.

Among the locals, the Capel Mair party, led by Mr. Reynolds; Mr. W. Thomas and party, Mr. D. Charles and friends, and Mr. D. Davies and friends, were deserving of commendation, as were also Misses Lowther and Letitia Evans, and Mrs. Jones, and Messrs. W. Thomas, D. Thomas (Tyrhos), and T. Lewis. Miss Daniel and Miss Edith Daniel accompanied with much taste throughout the evening.

The following is the programme:

  • Pianoforte duet, The Little Sailor, Misses Daniel and Lowther;
  • glee, Croeso’r Boreu, Capel Mair Party;
  • solo, Gitana, Miss Lowther;
  • glee, “Beautiful Rain,” (encored and repeated) Mr. W. Thomas and party;
  • solo, “Llwybr yr Wyddfa,” (encored and sang Bwthyn bach melyn fy Nhad”)
  • Eos Myrnach quartet, “Geiriau Mam,”
  • Mr. D. Charles and friends solo,
  • Mr. D. Davies solo, Baban diwrnod oed,” (encored)
  • Mr. D. Thomas, Tyrhos .Song, Darby and Joan,”
  • Miss Letitia Evans chorus, “Comrades Song of Hope,” (encored)
  • Llanfyrnach Party solo, Jerusalem,”
  • Mr. T. Lewis; duet, “As it fell upon a day,”
  • Misses Lowther and Evans. Part 2-Glee, Yr Haf,”
  • Capel Mair Party duet, O Gartref yr Eryr,” (encored and sang a duet from Blodwen “)
  • Eos Myrnach and Mrs Jones solo, Hen Ffon fy Nain,” (encored)
  • Mr. D. Thomas, Tyrhos; solo, Alone on the Raft,” (encored)
  • Eos Myrnach; chorus, “Y Gof,”
  • Llanfyrnach Party; solo, Pleser-fad Niagara,”
  • Mr. W. Thomas;
  • trio, Tri Chymro,” (encored)
  • Mr. D. Davies and friends; chorus, “The Martyrs of the Arena,” (encored)
  • Llafyrnach Party
  • finale, Hen Wlad fy Nhadau,” air by Eos Myrnach and chorus by the audience.

Votes of thanks to the Chairman and those who took part concluded the proceedings (probably early Boxing Day!)

  • 25 (Wed.) 1889

BETHANIA CONCERT

A grand evening concert was given in Bethania Chapel on Christmas night, and there was a crowded audience. A letter was read from Mr. Morgan-Richardson, Noyadd-Wilym, who had been announced to preside, regretting his inability to attend, and inclosing £2 towards the funds. In the absence of the chairman, Mr. W. Lewis, Brecon Old Bank, was unanimously voted to the chair. The Rev. T. J. Morris acted as conductor.

The following was the programme :

  • Pianoforte solo, Miss Gwynne, R.A.M. solo, “Baner ein Gwlad,”Gwyn Alaw” (encored, and responded with “My Pretty Jane”);
  • solo, “Remember me,” Miss S. A. Esau;
  • solo, Death of Nelson,” Mr. Wm. Thomas (encored, and responded with a Welsh song);
  • solo, The Blind Girl to her harp,” Miss S. A. Jenkins (encored, and responded with “Trip, Trip”);
  • solo, “I had a dream,” Mrs. S. A. Owen;
  • solo, The White Squall,” Mr. W. Jones
  • solo, “O dywed im’, awel y Nefoedd,” Llinos Gwent;
  • solo competition, “Mair Magdalen,” ten competed, three singing on the stage, the best being Miss Lizzie Jenkins, Greenfield-square
  • duet, Martial Spirit,” Gwyn Alaw and Mr. William Thomas;
  • juvenile choir competition, Y Galwadau,” three choirs, namely, Bethania (led by Mr. William Jenkins), Tabernacle (led by Mr. John James), and Mount Zion (led by Mr. D. Ivor Evans), and the prize was divided between Bethania and Mount Zion
  • choirs quartet, Mount Zion Party duet, “Howel, Howet, Llinos Gwent and Gwyn Alaw (encored, and repeated);
  • solo, Pleserfad Niagara,” Mr. William Thomas;
  • solo, Good Shepherd,” Gwyn Alaw
  • solo competition, Y Morwr Lion,” five entries, prize awarded to Mr. William Jones
  • choral competition, Cwynfan Prydain,” two choirs competed, namely, Tabernacle (led by Mr. E. Ceredig Evans), and Bethania (led by Mr. William Jenkins), and the prize was awarded to Bethania Choir
  • song, Aunty,” Llinos Gwent (encored, and responded with The Donkey Cart”)
  • finale, Hen Wlad fy Nhadau.”

It is but fair to say that the singing of Miss S. A. Jenkins (Llinos Gwent) was much admired she possesses a beautiful soprano voice of great power and compass, and should have a great future if she becomes a professional singer. Votes of thanks to the Chairman, Mr. Morgan-Richardson, the Conductor, Miss Gwynne (the accompanyist), and the singers, concluded the proceedings.

  • 25 1888 (Tues.)

THE WORKHOUSE.

On Christmas Day the inmates of the Workhouse were, as usual, through the generosity of Mr. Brigstoike, the much respected chairman of the Board of Guardians, treated to a splendid dinner, composed of roast beef, plum pudding, and beer, with two ounces of tobacco to those who smoked, and oranges to those who did not, and to the women and children.

Mr. Thomas Llewelyn and Mr. Lewis Davies superintended the distribution. A hearty vote of thanks to Mr. and Mrs. Brigstocke for their kindness, to Messrs. Llewelyn and Davies for superintending, and to the master and matron for the great trouble they had taken in preparing the good things, were unanimously passed.

Dinner being over, Mr. John James, St. Dogmells, and his choir, attended, and several pieces were sung, to the great delight of the inmates.

  • 25 1909 Bethania

Bethania Christmas Night 1909

Bethania Christmas Night 1909

  • 25 (Wed.) 2013 Tonight it’s Downton Abbey v. Mrs Brown’s Boys Christmas Special (Progress or what?)

MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL WHO HAVE READ THESE SNIPPETS OVER THE YEAR.

Next year  – more meat on these bones!

 

2 December (1887) First Salvation Army funeral at the cemetery

  • 2 1936 (Wed.) Grand Celebrity Concert at the Pav: Cardigan County School Choir. Conductor: Leslie W. Evans; Bass-Baritone: Idris Daniels; Tenor: Haydn Adams; Soprano: Jennie Evans-Jones; Contralto: Mattie Davies; with Dan Matthews, Pontardulais.
  • 2 1887 (Fri.) First Salvation Army funeral: Thomas Davies,  Mwldan.

6 November (1968) 1st sod cut at site of new Catholic Church (1912) Pav opened

6 1968 (Wed.) 1st sod cut at site of new Catholic Church. Contract of £49, 700

PRIESTS:

  • Joseph Higgins 1930-32
  • John Tole 1932
  • Wilfred Brodie 1932-3
  • Basil Rowlands 1933-36
  • Thomas Williams 1936
  • Joseph Wedlake 1937-9
  • Thomas Canning 1940
  • James McAniff 1941
  • B. O’Connell 1942-5
  • Phillip Dwyer 1946-7
  • William Andrews 1947
  • Albin Kaltenbach 1947-51
  • George A. Anwyll 1951-9
  • Raymond Joyce (curate) 1951-9
  • John McHugh 1950-61??
  • Arthur Davies 1961
  • Seamus Cunanne 1962-99
  • Augustine Paikkatt 1999-2003
  • Jason Jones 2003-
  • Paul Joseph
  • 6 1912 (Wed.)  Pav (The Pavilion Cinema) opened at 7.30 by the Mayor Ivor Evans. In the interval Cardigan Male Voice Party (conductor H H Evans) sang ‘Martyrs of the Arena’. Admission 3d, 4d, and 6d. Children half-price. Sold to H D Claypole, Pembroke Dock in 1919 and he was responsible for forming the Cardigan Cinema Co. Ltd. First workers: Mechanic operator: Harold Squibbs; Hall and door keeper: Tom White Jones; Pay Box attendant: Fred Mulraine; Pianist: Morien Peregrine; Indoor attendants: John L Griffiths, W Johnson; engineer: Owen Williams
  • 6 1908 (Fri.) Burial of John Conwyson Roberts, 20 Quay St., 67 years old

17 October (1880) Ten baptised in the Teifi

  • 17 1880 (Sun.) Ten persons were baptised in the river Teifi, at the Netpool, by the Rev. J. Williams, minister of Bethania Baptist Chapel, on Sunday afternoon last, in the presence of a large concourse of people. They were:

Griffith Griffith, son of Thomas Griffiths, grocer, Pendreuchaf; John Williams, son of William Williams, carpenter, Pendre isaf; David Jenkins, son of John Jenkins, waggoner, St. Mary’s St; James Thomas, sailor, Feidrfair; Anne Davies, daughter of Thomas Davies, a worker at Parcytrap; Anne Thomas, daughter to the wife of John Jenkins, stonemason, Pendre uchaf; Rachel Griffiths, daughter of John Griffiths, tinman, St Mary’s St; Frances Heyes, White Hart, St Mary’s St; Anne James, daughter of David James, Eben’s Lane and Margaret Jones, maidservant Mr Levi James, the ironmonger.